Cumbria Floods

On Thursday 19th November 2009, over 31 cm of rain fell in 24 hours on the Cumbrian mountains, the single largest daily rainfall total in the British Isles since records began. It caused unprecedented flooding, with Cockermouth and Workington being particularly badly hit.

On the Thursday I spent the whole day with Langdale/Ambleside Mountain rescue Team, rescuing stranded motorists. On the Friday I headed to Cockermouth to record the devastation. Dodging the police cordons I got onto the main street, waist deep in floodwater and photographed the RNLI rescuing residents by boat. Saturday was spent in Workington, looking at the demolished bridges.

Wading waist deep in the flood waters paid off as my images were used on the front pages of the Independent and Daily Mirror as well as internal shots in the Guardian and two other national papers.

A week later the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) published a map highlighting the increasing frequency and severity of extreme weather events as a result of climate change. The Cumbrian Floods were one of those events highlighted.

To view and purchase all the images taken of the Cumbrian floods go to:
http://www.globalwarmingimages.net/category_floods.html


PC Paul Burke inspects a flooded car form ocupants on the outskirts of Ambleside.

PC Paul Burke inspects a flooded car form ocupants on the outskirts of Ambleside.

Rescue workers evacuate residents from Cockermouth's main street.

Rescue workers evacuate residents from Cockermouth's main street.

A flooded car on the main street of Cockermouth.

A flooded car on the main street of Cockermouth.

A footbridge across the River Derwent at Workington, destroyed by the floods.

A footbridge across the River Derwent at Workington, destroyed by the floods.

The front page of the Independent.

The front page of the Independent.

The front page of the Mirror.

The front page of the Mirror.

Posted on December 8, 2009 at 2:43 pm by ashley · Permalink
In: Floods